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CCPW 2013 - Facts and Stats

The facts

  • Cervical cancer is a largely preventable disease.
  • After breast cancer, cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women aged 35 and under.
  • The most common symptoms of cervical cancer are:
    • Bleeding between periods
    • Bleeding after sexual intercourse
    • Post-menopausal bleeding
    • Unusual or unpleasant vaginal discharge
    • Discomfort or pain during sexual intercourse
    • Lower back pain.
  • Almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by a common virus called Human Papillomavirus (HPV).
  • You can catch the virus, called HPV as soon as you start having intimate relationships.
  • Cervical screening and HPV vaccination are the best ways to reduce your risk of getting cervical cancer.
  • HPV vaccination protects against two types of HPV that cause 70% of cervical cancers.
  • Smoking increases your risk of getting cervical cancer.

The stats

  • Every day in the UK 9 women are diagnosed and nearly 3 women die of cervical cancer.
  • Over 300,000 women a year are told they may have a cervical abnormality that could require treatment.
  • It is estimated that the UK Cervical Screening Programmes save 5,000 lives every year.
  • It is estimated that if the HPV vaccination take up continues to reach at least 80% it is believed this could result in a 2/3rds reduction in incidence in women under 30 by 2025.
  • The most recent figures for cervical screening uptake across the UK:
    • England: 78.6% (NHS National Screening Programme report 2011-12: figure represents women who have had a screening test within the last 5 years).
    • Northern Ireland: 77.3% (Northern Ireland Cervical Screening Programme 2010-11: Figures represent women who have had a screening test within the past 5 years).
    • Scotland: 73% (Scottish Cervical Screening Programme statistics 2011-12: Figure represents women who have had a screening test within the past 3.5 years).
    • Wales: 76.5% (Cervical Screening Programme Wales, 2011-12: Figures represent women who have had a screening test within the past 5 years).
Date last updated: 
17 Dec 2012