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Having the HPV vaccine privately

If you are not eligible to have the HPV vaccine for free, you may choose to pay for it. This is sometimes called having the HPV vaccine privately. 

The information on this page is for adults who are deciding whether to have the HPV vaccine. We have another page about having the HPV vaccine in school.

Read about having the HPV vaccine in school >

On this page:

Which HPV vaccines are available privately?

There are 3 HPV vaccines available privately.

Name of HPV vaccine Protects against
Gardasil
  • High-risk HPV 16 and 18
  • Low-risk HPV 6 and 11
Gardasil 9
  • High-risk HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58
  • Low-risk HPV 6 and 11
Cervarix
  • High-risk HPV 16 and 18

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more about the HPV vaccines >

 

Where can I get the HPV vaccine privately?

You can usually get the HPV vaccine in:

  • pharmacies
  • travel clinics
  • other health centres. 

You may also be able to pay for the HPV vaccine at your GP surgery.

How much does the HPV vaccine cost?

Each dose of the HPV vaccine usually costs between £120 and £160. If you are over 15 years old, you will need to have 3 doses within 6 months. 

Some GP surgeries ask you to pay an extra administration fee, so ask for the full cost before you book an appointment.

Is there an age limit for having the HPV vaccine?

Most clinics only offer the HPV vaccine to people up to and including age 45. This is because the vaccine license has been approved in the UK based on research showing it has benefit in people up to this age. 

You can check whether there is an age limit before you book an appointment. 

Can adults have the HPV vaccine for free?

If you are under the age of 25 and were offered the HPV vaccine in school, you may be able to have it for free. 

Read more about the HPV vaccine in schools >

Some other people may be able to have the HPV vaccine for free, including:

  • men who have sex with men – usually up to and including age 45
  • women and men with HIV
  • sex workers 
  • transgender people.

This is because the risk of having high-risk HPV that may develop into cell changes or cancer is usually higher for these people. 

These free HPV vaccines may be given in sexual health centres, HIV services, or another healthcare setting. If you think you are eligible for a free HPV vaccine, you can speak to your nurse or doctor about it. 

Who shouldn’t have the HPV vaccine?

Most people can have the HPV vaccine. You should not have the HPV vaccine if:

  • you had a severe allergic reaction to a previous dose of the HPV vaccine
  • you have a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient in the HPV vaccine
  • you are pregnant. 

If you feel unwell or have a high temperature on the day you are having the HPV vaccine, you should have it on another day instead. This is to avoid confusing the illness with any side effects of the vaccine. 

If you are unsure about whether you should have the HPV vaccine, it is best to speak with a nurse or doctor at your GP surgery. 

Having the HPV vaccine privately FAQs

The HPV vaccine cannot get rid of HPV that you already have, but it does protect against other types of HPV. So, if you already have HPV, this means the vaccine could still benefit you as it may offer protection against HPV types you don’t have. 

It is your choice whether to have the HPV vaccine. If you have had cervical cancer, research suggests that the HPV vaccine may protect you against other HPV types. However, this research is limited and more is being done to find out exactly what benefit this use of the HPV vaccine may have. You may want to talk with your doctor or nurse about your individual situation to help make a decision.

Read more about cervical cancer > 

It is your choice whether to have the HPV vaccine. If you have had CIN or CGIN, research suggests that the HPV vaccine may protect you against other HPV types. However, this research is limited and more is being done to find out exactly what benefit this use of the HPV vaccine may have. You may want to talk with your doctor or nurse about your individual situation to help make a decision.

Read more about CIN and CGIN >

It is your choice whether to have the HPV vaccine. You may want to read about HPV to help you make your decision – and if you would like to talk it through with someone, our trained Helpline volunteers are here on 0808 802 8000

Read about HPV >

There is limited research on the benefits of the HPV vaccine for people over 25. However, the research we do have suggests there is some benefit as, although it is more likely you will have been exposed to HPV, you may not have the types that the vaccine protects against.

The HPV vaccine may help protect your partner against HPV if they don’t already have certain HPV types. However, they might already have HPV or have had it and got rid of it. They may want to read this information about the HPV vaccine or speak with a doctor or nurse to make a decision. 

How we can help

You may want more information or support to help you decide whether to have the HPV vaccine. Our trained Helpline volunteers can talk it through with you on 0808 802 8000 or over email. 

Email our Helpline >

Our panel of experts can also answer general questions about the HPV vaccine. They can’t give you answers about your individual situation or health – it’s best to speak with your GP or nurse for that.

Use our Ask the Expert service >

Thank you to all the experts who checked the accuracy of this information, and the volunteers who shared their personal experience to help us develop it.

References

  • Gov.uk (2019). Chapter 18a: Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Greenbook. Web: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/828868/Greenbook_chapter_18a.pdf. Accessed October 2020.
  • Public Health England (2019). HPV vaccination: Information for healthcare practitioners. Web: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/813014/PHE_HPV_universal_programme_guidance.pdf. Accessed October 2020.
  • Vorsters, A. et al (2019). HPV vaccination: Are we overlooking additional opportunities to control HPV infection and transmission? International Journal of Infectious Diseases. 88. pp.110-112.
  • Karimi-Zarchi, M. et al (2020). Can the prophylactic quadrivalent HPV vaccine be used as a therapeutic agent in women with CIN? A randomized trial. BMC Public Health. 20;274. pp.1-7.
  • Castellsagué, X. et al (2011). End-of-study safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of quadrivalent HPV (types 6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine in adult women 24–45 years of age. BJC. 105. pp.28–37.

We write our information based on literature searches and expert review. For more information about the references we used, please contact [email protected]

Read more about how we research and write our information >

Contact us

If you have questions, concerns or just need to talk, we are here for you. Call our free Helpline on 0808 802 8000 or email us.

Email our Helpline
Date last updated: 
16 Dec 2021
Date due for review: 
16 Dec 2024
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